Formula Juan

I was chatting to a colleague yesterday about Jacques Villeneuve’s recent comments that he wouldn’t be averse to an F1 comeback. We pretty much agreed however that if Robert Kubica was having trouble reaching a suitable weight to run KERS, JV could be similarly troubled.

“Why not divide F1 into weight categories?” he asked.

“The heavyweight F1 world championship” I quipped… which got us talking about Juan Pablo Montoya.

This weekend marks six years since Montoya won the Monaco Grand Prix for Williams. Indeed it was the Colombian who scored the last of Williams’ 113 F1 victories back in 2004, and I couldn’t help but feel that Formula 1 of today is slightly poorer without him. I just loved his personality, his honesty and his humour. More than anything, though, I think I loved the way he raced. Foot to the floor, balls to the wall, hard-ass racing. He was one of very few drivers who really took it to Michael Schumacher, and in any other era might well have been an F1 champion himself. Arguably, he should have been.

Here’s some of his best bits Vs Michael.

And the other side of Mr Montoya… fairly fruity language, and possibly the single greatest F1 quote of the last decade.

Oh, and just one more… a brilliant advert.

FIA and FOTA in No Agreement Shocker

Shock news from the Monaco Grand Prix.

Formula 1′s problems have not been resolved by a four hour meeting on a yacht.

This incredible non-development in the ongoing saga didn’t happen yesterday afternoon, following two meetings of F1′s decision makers.

In all seriousness, F1′s problems at present are so deep seated that they were never going to be resolved in the space of one afternoon and two meetings. The FIA will not budge over its plans for a budget cap, nor its intention to rigorously check the teams’ accounts next season. FOTA, on the other hand, will not budge over their insistence for a heightening of the budget cap, the dropping of the two-tier 2010 technical regulations nor the requirement of the FIA to check their accounts.

Interestingly, all these three points fall almost into insignificance when one takes into account potentially the most telling line from FOTA President Luca di Montezemolo yesterday, when he declared that all the teams were united in their insistence in a change of governance at the FIA.

That’s a huge statement, because it isn’t just aimed at questioning the way in which the regulations have been changed, it is essentially calling on Max Mosley, as President of the FIA, to stand aside. By saying that FOTA will not be happy until the method of governance has changed, they are leaving a very clear decision.

Either Max goes, or they go.

It’s therefore no shock that FOTA and the FIA failed to find an agreement yesterday. And in the current political climate, it looks unlikely that any agreement will be forthcoming in the short term.

Two immovable political objects have met head on.